From CanadianPortal

Michael Dean

Reviewed by Tiziana La Melia     Flooring the floor. Dooring the door. Walling the wall.   — To / the look of touch.   In the video of bpNichol, Echoes Without Saying (1983), the Canadian poet says: “One of the things that you have when you have a book, anybody’s book, from an accounting textbook on, is you do have a hunk of sculpture . . . You have a little piece of sculpture that you can do things with.” bp is known for making books that tried to get out of books. Michael Dean makes books that are…

Newsletter Compendium 2007–2015

  Reviewed by Amy Lam   Newsletter Compendium 2007–2015 by Lisa Smolkin, a Toronto-based artist, is a collection of 19 handwritten, personal newsletters. The one-page newsletters include recipes, poems, pregnancy-prevention/fertility-control tips, snippets of conversations between Lisa and her son Jackie, recommendations for movies, short stories, dreams, etc. They were originally mailed to people on an irregular basis (there are no newsletters between 2011 and 2013). There’s lots of memorable one-liners—“Alienation corner: I dressed up like a flapper for Halloween :(”—mixed in with information that is more mysterious—“A 3-step process for making magical rags.” (“What you do with your magical rags…

Maya Fuhr

Reviewed by Lunakhods     Since first picking up a 35-mm camera in high school in her hometown of Victoria, British Columbia, photographer Maya Fuhr, now based in Toronto, Ontario, has produced lush, soft-hued images with an engaging and elusive quality. Her self-published book of photographs, made by Montreal’s Anteism, is a distillation of her aesthetic, which combines girly pastels and strong feminine expression in equal measure. The book is minimalist in its design, with one full-colour photograph laid out on each of its 13 white-page spreads. Fuhr’s curated selection of documentary photographs is pulled from a variety of favourite…

Land & Animal & Nonanimal

Reviewed by Xenia Benivolski     I acquired a copy of the wonderful and determined Land & Animal & Nonanimal at the book’s launch at Art Metropole in Toronto, where I was late to hear Mitchell Akiyama talk about the subject of camera stalking and masculinity, which is at the centre of “Unbecoming, Animal”, the second of his two essays in the book. While familiar with Akiyama’s musical work, I had no idea that he was writing on the Anthropocene, a subject on many pages and minds these days. This intersectional focus on theory and practice is clearly established as…