Tagged 4.0

Outland

Reviewed by Ananda Pellerin   “Sexy boys, fancy boys / Playboys, bad boys / I fink u freeky and I like you a lot” —Die Antwoord   Long curling toenails and rats in dirty beds: Roger Ballen’s world can be an ugly place. In fact it’s unrelentingly ugly in this new anthology  by the New York-born, Johannesburg-based photographer. Cross-eyed and one-eyed men and children with misshapen heads; animals that are better groomed than their destitute owners—they are unsettling but certainly transfixing, these domestic mise-en-scènes set in small South African towns. Originally published in 2001, this recently expanded edition of post-Apartheid…

Picturing Beirut

Reviewed by Iris Yirei Hu     All the Clocks Have Stopped at Different Times   I am traveling back home—a distant land, one that I never inhabited for more than a summer. I am returning to the same flat that my grandmother adopted in Taipei after World War II and the Chinese Civil War. The one in which my mother and five of her older siblings were born. It is the vessel that houses my history, though I am only familiar with it from a distance.   It is with this lens that I am writing about artist Gilda…

New York School Painters & Poets – Neon in Daylight

Reviewed by Lorraine Lupo     In a way it should never have been called the New York School – maybe New York Hangout/Party/Get-Together? Which isn’t to say they weren’t serious. Which isn’t to say that fun wasn’t crucial.   New York School Painters & Poets – Neon in Daylight (deftly assembled by editors Jenni Quilter, Bill Berkson and Larry Fagin, and with excellent essays by Quilter) tells the history of the brushing up against, and full collaboration between, visual artists and poets of what we call, for better or worse, the first and second generations of the New York…

Girl in a Band

Reviewed by Lia Trinka-Browner   #Who’sKimGordon?   The 1970s was the first era that learned how to exploit youth culture, and it was the birthplace of corporate rock. It didn’t last long. By 1977 the Clash had written a song with the lyric “No Elvis, Beatles, or the Rolling Stones” and Iggy Pop and the Stooges had burst forward as the first punk rockers. But Iggy had been there all along, rumbling under the beatific skies of the 1960’s—a disruption into what was supposed to be entertainment and positive vibes. Iggy walked out into the audience, broke glass, smeared himself…

Newsletter Compendium 2007–2015

  Reviewed by Amy Lam   Newsletter Compendium 2007–2015 by Lisa Smolkin, a Toronto-based artist, is a collection of 19 handwritten, personal newsletters. The one-page newsletters include recipes, poems, pregnancy-prevention/fertility-control tips, snippets of conversations between Lisa and her son Jackie, recommendations for movies, short stories, dreams, etc. They were originally mailed to people on an irregular basis (there are no newsletters between 2011 and 2013). There’s lots of memorable one-liners—“Alienation corner: I dressed up like a flapper for Halloween :(”—mixed in with information that is more mysterious—“A 3-step process for making magical rags.” (“What you do with your magical rags…

Maya Fuhr

Reviewed by Lunakhods     Since first picking up a 35-mm camera in high school in her hometown of Victoria, British Columbia, photographer Maya Fuhr, now based in Toronto, Ontario, has produced lush, soft-hued images with an engaging and elusive quality. Her self-published book of photographs, made by Montreal’s Anteism, is a distillation of her aesthetic, which combines girly pastels and strong feminine expression in equal measure. The book is minimalist in its design, with one full-colour photograph laid out on each of its 13 white-page spreads. Fuhr’s curated selection of documentary photographs is pulled from a variety of favourite…

Land & Animal & Nonanimal

Reviewed by Xenia Benivolski     I acquired a copy of the wonderful and determined Land & Animal & Nonanimal at the book’s launch at Art Metropole in Toronto, where I was late to hear Mitchell Akiyama talk about the subject of camera stalking and masculinity, which is at the centre of “Unbecoming, Animal”, the second of his two essays in the book. While familiar with Akiyama’s musical work, I had no idea that he was writing on the Anthropocene, a subject on many pages and minds these days. This intersectional focus on theory and practice is clearly established as…